As promised, here’s the “Part 2” from the last post. But first, and update on the autonomic anomaly that I am.

I went to see my Cardiologist/Autonomic Rock Star and he actually shed some light one quite a bit.  He said there is some definite signs of small fiber neuropathy going on. The small nerve fibers are what is responsible for all those involuntary bodily functions like breathing, temperature, regulation, cardiovascular function, and digestion. Yep, digestion! To be fair, we figured that my digestion and motility issues were partly autonomic in nature. It usually is for us EDSers. The bigger question was what was going on with my autonomic nervous system in the first place. Dr. Autonomic Rock Star said that given my symptoms, the fact that I don’t seem to fit the typical/more common type of autonomic disorders, and that my symptoms came on relatively quickly compared to most autonomic disorders, he really thinks that what I may have going on is actually autoimmune in nature.

Autonomic Nervous System: Parasympathetic & Sympathetic

He said that if it turns out it is autoimmune, there are treatments available that could help relieve the symptoms, possibly even help improve my intestinal transit. So before I have surgery, he wants me to under go a series of tests. Some blood work to check for antibodies against the cardiovascular system and the digestive system, sweat test as autonomic disorders can cause issues with sweating properly, skin biopsy to look at the small nerve fibers, and something called a Level 3 Cardio-Pulmonary Test.

The blood work was done in the office, no biggie. The sweat test will be done at the same time as the Level 3, I think. The skin biopsy was last week, but is, and deserves, a whole other post of its own. The Level 3 will be this coming Tuesday, and I have to say, I’m a bit nervous about this one as it involves a catheter placed through the jugular vein and goes into the heart and lungs. Oh yea, and I have to be AWAKE for this! A catheter will also be placed into an artery in my wrist, which can be harder to do than placing a basic IV.  This test is to measure lung and heart function – According to the Mass General website it gives a “precise measurement of heart pumping function, blood vessel function and skeletal muscle function.”

So, until we know the results of all these tests, the surgery is post-poned.

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